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Bahamas Southern Islands

Map of Bahamas Out Island
The southern part of the Bahamas island chain has several more islands, which are less known, sparsely populated and undeveloped from a tourism perspective.

These Bahamas Out Islands are Acklins and Crooked Island, Inagua and Mayaguana.

This travel guide provides you with interesting facts about the 4 islands, how to travel to these remote islands, the interesting sights and a short overview about the touristic infrastructure for those travellers who want to visit these Out Islands.

Crooked and Acklins Islands: Interesting Facts

About 223 miles southeast of Nassau, Bahamas the Crooked and Acklins Island encircle a shallow lagoon known as the Bight of Acklins. The islands has about 400 inhabitants on each island.

The major resort is Pittstown Point Landings at the northern tip of Crooked Islands. The waters at the northern end is a true fishermen paradise with one of the best flats for bonefishing as well as good inshore and offshore fishing possibilities.

The remote resort has miles of open beach at its doorstep and offers a large variety of fishing , diving and snorkeling activities.


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The islands are connected via a direct flight from Nassau twice a week. Bahamasair land at Colonel Hill on Crooked Island and at Spring Point on Acklins Island.

Guests at the Pittstown Point landing can be picked up at Colonel Hill by prior arrangement or there is a airstrip at the resort for private and charter flights.

There is also a mailboat service once a week from Nassau to Acklins and Crooked Island and return. The trip takes about 18 hours.

The major interesting sights are some planation ruins at Marine Farm and Hope Great House at the northern tip of Crooked Island.

There are also two lighthouses from the 19th century. One at the northern tip of Crooked Island. The Bird Rock Lighthouse still welcomes pilots and sailors to the Pittstown Point Landings resort.

The Castle Island Lighthouse at Acklins Island southern tip, formerly served as a beacon for pirates who used to retreat there after attacking ships.

A vacation on Crooked or Acklins Island is perfect for people who look for a peaceful, remote and quiet place and who love to fish, dive and snorkel.

Inagua Island: Interesting Facts

Great Inagua is the Bahamas third largest island, 25 miles wide and 45 miles long. The terrain is mostly flat and covered with scrub.

An unusual climate of little rainfall and continual trade winds created rich salt ponds. The Morton Salt Company harvests a million tons of salt annually at its Matthew Town factory. About a quarter of the population of Inagua works for the company.



Inagua is also best known for the huge flocks of pink flamingoes that reside in the island's vast national park and on the property belonging to the salt company. In addition to the flamingoes, the islands is also home to vast variety of birds like the Bahama parrot, herons, egrets, owls, cormorants and a hundred more species.

The island is a very good spot for bird lovers which makes also the majority of the island visitors. Otherwise the island is virtually undiscovered by outsiders.

The island only inhabited settlement is Matthew Town with about 1000 inhabitants, were most of the workers for the salt company live. There are no major touristic infrastructure, only a small apartment house, some Bed and Breakfast accommodation and a guest house in Matthew Town.

There also no beaches too speak off. However, there are virgin reefs off the island for the intrepid divers who bring their own equipment. Adventurous and self-sufficient bonefishers have also discovered untouched flats on the northwest and southwest shorelines.

You can reach Inagua three times a week from Nassau with Bahamasair or by mailboat which has a weekly schedule. The trip by mailboat takes about 24 hours.

Inagua is an ideal place for the adventurous vacationer who loves to watch birds, fish and dive in remote areas and does not need any touristic infrastructure.

Mayaguana Island and Samana Cay: Interesting Facts

Mayaguana is a medium-sized Bahamian island of about 285 sq. and not more than 300 inhabitants. The most people live in the main settlement Abraham Bay. Other very small settlements are Pirates Well and Betsy Bay.

Many of the homes have a rural innocence from another era. Fishing, farming and a few government positions are the only source of work on the island.

From a tourism perspective there is no infrastructure at all, a really remote island which waits to be discovered.

Samana Cay, north of Crooked Island has been inhabited seasonally by farmers from the nearby Acklins and by collectors of cascarilla bark.

The cascarilla bark has a rich spicy aroma and pieces of the bark are an important ingredient of the popular liqueur Campari. Samana Cay is the third largest growing habitat of the cascarilla bark after Acklins and Crooked Island.




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